The Getty And National Gallery Have Been Gifted with Incredible Photographs

One of my favorite photo collections in the world, and one of the best places to see photographs, The Getty in Los Angeles, just got a huge new grouping of images. Along with other notable institutions, we should all look forward to seeing this work on the walls at the Getty Center.

GETTY MUSEUM AND NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART ANNOUNCE MAJOR GIFTS OF PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE COLLECTION OF DANIEL GREENBERG AND SUSAN STEINHAUSER

Gifts include works by Dorothea Lange, Mary Ellen Mark, William Eggleston, and Richard Misrach, among others.

LOS ANGELES/WASHINGTON – The J. Paul Getty Museum and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, announced today major gifts of photographs from the collection of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser. The Getty’s gift includes 386 works of art by 17 different photographers, including works by some of the most influential American practitioners of the 20th century, and 23 additional photographs as future gifts. The Gallery’s gift includes 143 gelatin silver prints by Dorothea Lange, with 10 additional photographs by Lange promised. These two gifts are the key elements of a broader initiative by Greenberg and Steinhauser that involved donations to a total of 13 leading art institutions.

Greenberg and Steinhauser have been collecting photographs for over 20 years, largely by 20th-century American masters, but also by Latin American and Japanese makers. In keeping with their belief in sharing their collection with the public, they have previously donated very significant bodies of photographs, ceramics, turned wood, and contemporary studio glass to a number of institutions over the years.

“While collecting is a mysterious endeavor, and living with the art is profound, the act of gifting is a joyous and wonderful moment in time,” says Daniel Greenberg. “As Susan and I begin a new chapter in our lives, and after decades of acting as temporary stewards for these photographs, we are excited that now is the time that we can share some of the best works we have owned with the public.”

“These gifts, which are the largest we have made to date, are part of a larger personal commitment through which we are supporting many leading art museums around the country with gifts primarily from our photography collection,” says Susan Steinhauser. “Each photo reminds us of the circumstances under which we searched for, found, experienced and shared it with others. These photographs helped shape our lives and led to many long-lasting friendships. It is our hope that the public will embrace them as enthusiastically as we have.”

The Getty acquisition:

Highlights of the Getty acquisition include the first works by Ruth Bernhard and Eudora Welty to enter the Museum’s collection. Best known for her studies of the female nude, the German-born Bernhard became one of the leading photographers on the West Coast. While Welty is better known as an American novelist, she also had a serious interest in photography, and her work conveys a similar connection with her subjects that can be seen in her books. The donation of 27 works by Imogen Cunningham complements the 66 prints already in the Getty’s collection, and sets the stage for a possible monographic exhibition of her work. The donation of Chris Killip’s Isle of Man portfolio of 12 prints comes as the Getty prepares for a major exhibition of the artist’s work opening May 23, 2017.


Ruth Bernhard (American, born Germany, 1905 – 2006) Untitled, 1936
Reproduced with permission of The Ruth Bernhard Archive, Princeton
University Art Museum. © Trustees of Princeton University

“This incredibly generous donation will complement and strengthen the Getty’s holdings of several major photographers, and provide a rich trove of images from which to organize future exhibitions,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “The gift to the Getty includes both individual prints and portfolios, with the latter giving us the opportunity to represent specific bodies of a photographer’s work in depth. We are extremely grateful to Dan and Susan for their generosity and continued support of the Getty’s Department of Photographs.”

The Getty Museum holds one of the world’s preeminent collections of photographs, and Los Angeles has become an important center for the study of the history and art of photography. Greenberg and Steinhauser are founding members of the Getty Museum Photographs Council, of which Greenberg is the current chairman and Steinhauser is a past chair. Since 2000, they have donated over 500 photographs to the Getty, including significant groups of works by Manuel Álvaraz Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Abelardo Morell, Eliot Porter, and Minor White, all of which inspired exhibitions organized at the Getty Museum in recent years.

The Getty gift includes:

 12 works by Berenice Abbott (American, 1898-1991)
 29 works by Ruth Bernhard (American, born Germany, 1905-2006)
 18 works by Wynn Bullock (1902-1975)
 27 works by Imogen Cunningham (American, 1883-1976)
 57 works by Bruce Davidson (American, born 1933)
 14 works by William Eggleston (American, born 1939)
 1 work by Andreas Feininger (American, born France, 1906-1999)
 96 works by Mario Giacomelli (Italian, 1925-2000)
 5 works by André Kertész (American, born Hungary, 1894-1985)
 12 works by Chris Killip (British, born 1946)
 1 work by Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965)
 15 works by Mary Ellen Mark (American, 1940-2015)
 26 works by Richard Misrach (American, born 1949)
 18 works by Abelardo Morell (American, born Cuba, born 1948)
 9 works by Arnold Newman (American, 1918-2006)
 8 works by Milton Rogovin (American, 1909-2011)
 38 works by Eudora Welty (American, 1909-2011)


Abelardo Morell (American, born Cuba, 1948)
Title/Date: Camera Obscura Image of Santa Maria Della Salute in Palazzo
Bedroom, 2006
Copyright: © Abelardo Morell
Credit: The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Gift of Daniel Greenberg and
Susan Steinhauser

National Gallery of Art acquisition:

The Greenberg and Steinhauser gift establishes the National Gallery of Art as one of the major repositories of Lange’s work in the world, powerfully revealing why she remains one of the country’s most acclaimed documentary photographers. An excellent and comprehensive holding of Lange’s photographs, this gift represents her entire career from the late 1920s to the early 1960s.

“With only two photographs by Lange previously in the Gallery’s collection, Dan and Susan’s donation is a truly transformative gift,” said Earl A. Powell III, director of the National Gallery of Art, Washington. “The exceptional depth and breadth of this group of photographs will allow the Gallery to beautifully illustrate the full range of Lange’s art, from her early studio portraits and her profoundly moving documents of the impact of the Great Depression on the American people, to her later pictures featuring people and cultures she engaged with while traveling around the world.”

One of the best known American photographers working in the 1930s, Dorothea Lange was made famous by her 1936 portrait of an impoverished migrant farm worker and her children in Nipomo, California, called Migrant Mother. However, Lange began her career as a studio portraitist working in San Francisco with a mostly upper-class clientele. Between 1929 and 1933, the years bookended by the Stock Market crash and the start of the New Deal, Lange struggled to redefine her professional identity. Yet in 1933 as she looked for subjects outside her studio—from breadlines and homelessness to labor demonstrations and workers’ strikes—she found her voice, responding directly to what she saw and helping to define what would become known as social documentary photography.

Lange was a committed photographer whose works have been consistently received as compelling records of the human condition. But her carefully composed pictures, often closely cropped to increase their emotional intensity, also reveal her remarkable talent for marrying eye-catching formal compositions with captivating, socially charged subject matter. Of particular note, this collection contains multiple prints made over several years of some of Lange’s most celebrated photographs—such as Death in the Doorway, Migrant Mother, and Migratory Cotton Picker—which will help the Gallery elucidate to students and scholars alike the evolving nature of her practice.

Founded in 1990, the National Gallery of Art’s collection of photographs and its program for photography have become one of the most celebrated in the world, with large, in-depth holdings of work by such celebrated photographers as Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Walker Evans, Ilse Bing, Robert Frank, Harry Callahan, and Robert Adams, among others, and numerous award-winning exhibitions and publications.

The first donation to the National Gallery by Greenberg and Steinhauser, this gift is a major addition to the Gallery’s large holdings of works by such social documentary photographers as Gordon Parks and Jim Goldberg. Several of the pictures donated by Greenberg and Steinhauser will be featured in The New Woman Behind the Camera (2019), as well as other forthcoming exhibitions.

In addition to their generous gifts to the Getty and the National Gallery of Art, Greenberg and Steinhauser have recently made gifts to 13 other American art museums, including the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Virginia; the Hammer Museum at UCLA; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe; and Peabody-Essex Museum, Salem, MA.

Images:

Left: Rekha with Beads in Her Mouth, 1978. Mary Ellen Mark (American, 1940-2015). Dye transfer print. 30.8 x 47.6 cm (12 1/8 x 18 3/4 in.). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser. © Mary Ellen Mark

Center: Migratory Cotton Picker, Eloy, Arizona, 1940. Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965). Gelatin silver print, printed 1950s. 7 x 9 in. Gift of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser

Right: 10.31.98, 5:22 PM, negative 1998, print 1999. Richard Misrach (American, born 1949). Dye coupler print. 50.8 x 61 cm (20 x 24 in.). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser. © Richard Misrach, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco, Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York and Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles­

Real World Review – Tether Tools Case Relay – Long Term UNINTERRUPTED Power!

What photo problems makes you dive down the rabbit hole of possible solutions?
How many times have you late night googled a range of terms to find the right answer to a specific problem?
Too many times to count, for me.
One of the recent trips down the information highway was road mapped by a constant issue: Portable, uninterrupted power.
You know that you have many, many batteries for each of your devices: cameras, speedlights, smartphones, tablets, etc.
And all of the chargers needed to keep them topped off. A basket full, right? Ok, we all need a lot of power.
Specifically, I was on the hunt for a system that allowed me to do an overnight time-lapse. The trick was having enough power to keep the camera on during the process!
Without interruption.
Sure, you can switch out batteries, but you’ll have a glitch in your sequence.
After a ton of research, I found the most cost-effective, and portable solution:

The Case Relay System from Tether Tools.

It’s a simple concept-a dummy battery inserted into your camera, leading to a unit that, not only prevents any electrical overcharge but also has a battery enclosed, and a connector to another higher capacity battery.
Even if you need to change the large battery, the internal battery keeps the shooting going as you change batts.
This is especially critical in video productions.

They make battery adaptors for most of the cameras out there. Personally, I use Nikon, Fuji, Sony (for Atomos+ Fotodiox FlapJack light), Canon video, and BlackMagic Pocket Cinema adaptors. I’ll tell ya, these cameras can all use a bigger battery. More so on the mirrorless and video cameras.

Not just for continuous on time lapse either. If you are running a photo booth, or covering a loooooong event, you need this system.
And a new item recently released, allows you to access a D-Tap battery, giving you double USB, outlet. No, it’s not USB 3.0, but you’re just looking for the power.

At a price of $100 for the main set-up, and a range of prices for the coupler (dummy batts) is from $30-$40.
You may want to either get into their velcro strapping system, or work out something on your own to hold the whole set-up while in use.

This system has become a permanent addition to my imaging tool kit, I have all of the adaptors for the cameras, and use a solid phone charger to power them.

This simple concept makes it a great product. Coupled with solid design, tech, and sweet price point.
It always comes down to problem/solution.

Continuing their goal of improving the tethered experience, they just came out with Case Air, which is the first camera controller to truly rival CamRanger. Plus smaller and cheaper.

Wireless tethering made easier.

I first became aware of TetherTools while searching for a proper table to add to a support for tethering my camera to laptop (another late night google hunt). They have the best solutions I’ve seen, plus the right add-ons to make the system complete.
Obviously, they are speaking with photographers and know the needs of the community.
Ye, I’m a fan. And great customer service as well.

Good people, making solid products.

Real World Review – Why I Depend on Lexar

It’s something that you don’t want to think about: Media Cards.
Pop it into your camera, and shoot.
Because I don’t want to think about it, I have chosen one brand to use, and stick with it. Lexar
Yes, you can scan over Ebay and Amazon, and find all kinds of brands that may be cheaper, but this is about your images. What better insurance than to rely on a dependable product?
OK, why Lexar?
A few reasons:
they make the top pro speed cards, which is essential when you need to shoot a burst, and your camera can handle a good size buffer. Like sports, or music. If your card is too slow, you’ll be waiting for the images to write to that card, and you’ll miss that shot.
Trust me, I’ve done that. Honestly, sometimes using older cards and just slide one in, and pay the price. The pulsing light on the back of the camera, telling you the files are writing to the card, is the WORST!
So I always upgrade to the fastest speed, when I can.
They support you with every card, and include a code for media card recovery software. I’ve only used it once, but that’s enough.
Most importantly, memory and memory management is their business. Period. That means they depend on their products as much as you do.

Here is the super fast SD card, with 300MB/s, and it even comes with it’s own speedy reader, if you are not on the Thunderbolt HUB. See below.

And if you shoot video, especially 4K, if you don’t have speed, you have nothing.

I recently moved to a new video camera after 5 years, the Canon XC-15. This thing is so blazing at 4K, it has heat dissipation vents, and records at 305MPS @ 4K! And you do need the new CFast cards to take advantage of that 4K. Lexar has you covered.

Yep, from CF, to SD, to Micro SD, to XQD (let’s see what happens there) to CFast. With speeds allowing you to capture RAW, ProRes, and 4K video. You get read transfer speed up to 540 MB/s and write transfer speed of up to 445 MB/s, speeding up your post production workflow.
And here is a shot of the new rig:


I go from using the audio add-on module, to walking the trade show floor with this Rode. That is a Fotodiox ring light I use, which has a dimmer, battery operated, and saves me using a cold shoe on top of the camera.

And getting to workflow: I’m a massive fan of the Lexar HUB system. The modular set-up has allowed me to grow with my gear, and speed up the post production process. When I first got into the system, it was mainly CF cards. Then SD’s came in heavy, and I picked up more modules, depending on the system I was shooting. Of course, the micro SD GoPro needs, brought another module in.
And now CFast.
Here is my luxurious desk at my hotel in LAs Vegas at CES in Jan..

The beauty of this system is that it has a Thunderbolt flow-through, and on the road, this little tower lets me download up to 4 cards concurrently. Remember, not consecutively, concurrently! Big time savings. And when I add the SSD module, I get 512 GB of storage. I leave my RAID at home, and just save on that drive, and 1 external HD. Paranoid? Maybe, but don’t want to lose anything. Cheap insurance.

I will reveal something about me here, that does color some of my choices: I produce commercials for a living, and the cameras we use range from RED to Arri Alexa. Now all I’ll be doing on those sets, imaging wise, is some behind the scenes materials. The heavy lifting camera crew uses the full tilt packages. And Lexar CFast cards are what they use in Arri. When I have a million dollar commercial I’m producing, and the camera dept. is using a certain brand, I feel good And it’s confirmation for my choices as well.

There you have it: Lexar fast media cards, and the Lexar HUB make my life simpler.

Let’s be honest, there are some other players out there.
I just know that Lexar is always high quality products, that I can depend on. One less choice I have to make everyday.
Kinda like wearing pretty much the same things everyday (yes, I have multiples of the same thing, not wearing one set all the time. that would be gross).
It just works.

Real World Review : All About Remote Control

There are so many way to control how you press the shutter on your camera, I had to do a deep dive into the world, and try to make some sense of it all.
3 of the units reviewed here: CamRanger, Case Air, and Pulse. The 4th, Manfrotto Digital Director, is way bigger and shown later in the post. (quarter there for size ref)

Like most gear reviewed here, the mission to find the best in a category comes from a need.
Problem > solution type of situation.
Now, you may wonder, “what the heck do i need to add anything else to the camera?” My self timer works just fine, thank you very much.
I wanted to take a shot of me holding a product, and didn’t want to self timer it. I’m an adult and no need to run back and forth to the camera.
I was brought up with a shutter release cable, and now can do all I need, and more, via devices and apps.
There are other things you may want to do that can be sooo much better controlled remotely.
Continue Reading »

Holiday Gift Guide 2016 – Part 5 : The Light Modifiers

It’s a constant search for the Holy grail of the best light modifier. We’ll just talk about the speedlight range here.

Since not a whole lot new has come on the market since last year, that should adjust your thinking. I’m sure you’ll want to try at least one of these units, and perhaps add them to your wish list.

Except this cool tool, from Lastolite – The EzyBounce.
screen-shot-2016-12-04-at-4-24-18-pm
What’s cool about this is the size and ease of use. It’s a 6 panel white reflector, with hinges at each of the panels, that are stiff enough at those points to stay where you configure it. My hope is that it stays as stiff as it is now, after continual use.
screen-shot-2016-12-04-at-3-08-40-pm

Connecting to your speed light by a heavy duty rubber strap, with holes and pegs to keep it tight on the light.

And when you are done, it folds flat, and easy to stash.

For only $30, you really need this in your bag.

Next up is a new addition to the bag for the last year, MagMods MagSphere.

screen-shot-2016-12-04-at-3-36-11-pm

It does get you into a system of magnets, set in silicone, holding modifiers, and does a great job of it. The light is soft and beautiful, and they have come up with a whole line-up of tools, to expand your creativity.

Simple, and it pops on your speedlight for an overall soft spread of light. I will admit that sometimes picking it out of my bag, some other metal things want to come with it, due to the magnets, can’t avoid that.

About $50

Next up is one of my all time favorite mods to give me that Ring Light look. The RoundFlash . This thing packs small, pops open easy, is lightweight, and most importantly, does the job. Pop it open, put your speedlight into the hot shoe, poke the speedlight head thought the top port on the back of the unit and you are good to go.

screen-shot-2016-12-04-at-3-52-18-pm

Only $113. Yes, there are imitations, like a lot of stuff, but get the original, you’ll be happy you did.

here is a sample shot from Comic-Con 2016, using the RoundFlash, and a Nikon D810, 24-70 2.8 lens

ggd_7719

More gift ideas to come……

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Upcoming Events

Is there an event we should know about?
Let us know on twitter.

Current Exhibitions

  • Metropolitan Museum Of Art
  • Irving Penn: Centennial
  • APR 24, 2017–July 30th, 2017
  • 1000 Fifth Avenue
  • New York, NY 10028
  • Phone: 212-535-7710
  • Annenberg Space for Photography
  • GENERATION WEALTH BY LAUREN GREENFIELD
  • APR 8, 2017 – AUG 13, 2017
  • 2000 Avenue of the Stars, #10
  • Century City, CA. 90067
  • Tel: 213.403.3000
  • Getty Center
  • Now Then: Chris Killip and the Making of In Flagrante
  • May 23rd-Aug. 13th, 2017
  • 1200 Getty Center Drive
  • Los Angeles, CA. 90049
  • Tel: 310-440-7300
  • Museum of Modern Art
  • Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW
  • Through July 30th, 2017
  • 11 West 53 Street
  • New York,NY 10001
  • Tel:212-708-9400
  • Yossi Milo Gallery
  • Mark Ruwedel-HELL and HOME
  • May 4th-June 24th, 2017
  • 245 Tenth Avenue
  • New York,NY 10001
  • Tel: 212-414-0370
  • Howard Greenberg Gallery
  • LIVES & STILL LIVES: LESLIE GILL, FRANCES MCLAUGHLIN-GILL, AND THEIR CIRCLE
  • MAY 25 – JULY 7, 2017
  • 41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406
  • New York,NY 10022
  • Tel: 212-334-0100
  • Peter Fetterman Gallery
  • SEBASTIÃO SALGADO A Life in Photography
  • June 3 – September 2, 2017
  • 2525 Michigan Avenue Gallery A1
  • Santa Monica, CA
  • 90404
  • Phone: 310.453.6463

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