Lightroom 4: A fresh sole to a comfortable pair of shoes.

Years ago we did a side by side with Aperture and Lightroom.
Same media card, same images, same everything.
The ergonomics of Lightroom just felt right. It worked the way and how we think about our photography.
So we stayed. And watched as the versions continued through the years. Still happy.

We’re now on V4 and, while not drastically changing your workflow, this awesome asset management software has some added features that will convince the fence sitters, and for $80, give the loyal more than their moneys worth.

First off is something we particularly like, which goes back to our days as locations scouts for filming.
The map function helps you geotag your photos (which may be tagged in the EXIF files already) and choose the format for your google-ly visual format.
Scout your shoot, or trace your vacation steps, this easy to use module is an improvement over the previous version which required a tagging info module at the camera.
One negative here though, is that sharing the map is not a clear operation. We just use Snapz Pro and take a shot for the mappage. Must be an easier way, right?

Next up is a book module which is an easy to use Blurb book designer with a drag and drop functionality.
Don’t want to leave your asset management home? Need to put together a fast book?
Here you go. You may want to work with a more robust version of the Blurb software and Lightroom 4 can export directly to it.

This is probably the most useful and favorite tool of ours in the upgrade: selective local control over white balance, moire, and noise reduction.
ever deal with more that 3 temps of light in a shot? We have.
These new tools, bring you a sophisticated way to deal with the Kelvin that the situation gave you.
Loved the adjustable brush feature from the last round and now it’s just better with the added tools.

We do miss the fill light adjustment, although it’s time to put away the little kids toys and use bigger words like highlight and shadow and curves.
Just kidding, and the fresh system is just fine.

And of course, you knew this was coming: a video basics feature allowing you to not only log the video coming in from your DSLR, but also do some trimming and add basic picture adjustments to your moving pictures.
And export it to facebook directly if you like , as you can also export in H.264.
You should go to a more featured edit program for the real deal, but this is a fast and furious, down and dirty way to get your stuff out there fast.

And It’s even easier to email though the program, once you’ve set up your accounts.
We use the Facebook and Flickr system pretty heavily. Saves a step. and time.

Yes, we know it looks like we are making a book about Pink’s Hot Dogs, after shooting our food there, geo-locating it on our map, perhaps soft proofing if someone wanted to buy a print of these delicious dogs, posting it to Facebook (yes we did!) emailing to friends who refuse to join Facebook (yep, we know them), and archiving the files in multiple places at one import.
Looks a little bit like that, right?

We just used one lunchtime shooting to illustrate all of the ways Lightroom can touch and help share your photography. And food becomes the subject we used as the vehicle.

Would we spend the money to upgrade?
OK, fine. You had us at Adobe.
So a resounding yes.

This is a program we use very day. To keep up with the upgrades that a company we trust is making, is a no brainer.
Available now.
Oh, and here are some free tools from Adobe.

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Upcoming Events

  • PhotoPlus Expo
  • Oct. 19th -22nd, 2016
  • Jacob Javits Convention Center, New York City
  • Lucie Awards
  • Oct. 23rd, 2016
  • Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall, New York City

Is there an event we should know about?
Let us know on twitter.

Current Exhibitions

  • Met Breuer
  • Diane Arbus-In The Beginning
  • July 12th – November 27th, 2016
  • 945 Madison Avenue
  • New York, NY 10021
  • Phone: 212.731.1675
  • Whitney Museum
  • APR 27, 2016–FEB 12, 2017
  • 99 Gansevoort Street
  • New York, NY 10014
  • Tel: 212.570.3600
  • Getty Center
  • Richard Learoyd: In the Studio
  • August 30 – November 27, 2016
  • 1200 Getty Center Drive
  • Los Angeles, CA. 90049
  • Tel: 310-440-7300
  • Museum of Modern Art
  • Nan Goldin
  • May 26 – Feb 12, 2017
  • 11 West 53 Street
  • New York,NY 10001
  • Tel:212-708-9400
  • Yossi Milo Gallery
  • Simen Johan
  • May 26–August 10, 2016
  • 245 Tenth Avenue
  • New York,NY 10001
  • Tel: 212-414-0370
  • Howard Greenberg Gallery
  • JULY 6 – SEPTEMBER 2, 2016
  • 41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406
  • New York,NY 10022
  • Tel: 212-334-0100
  • KlompChing Gallery
  • FRESH 2016
  • July 13–August 6, 2016
  • 89 Water Street
  • Brooklyn, NY
  • 11201
  • Phone:212.796.2070
  • Peter Fetterman Gallery
  • Neil Leifer
  • June 4 – September 3, 2016
  • 2525 Michigan Avenue Gallery A1
  • Santa Monica, CA
  • 90404
  • Phone: 310.453.6463
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Crime Stories: Photography and Foul Play
  • Through July 31st, 2016
  • 1000 Fifth Avenue (at 82nd Street)
  • New York, NY 10028
  • Phone: 212-535-7710

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